Q&A: Fundraising and COVID-19

When the pandemic first started making an impact on our lives back in March, I was scheduled to meet with a team of MBA students out of Tel Aviv University. These students were working on a project with a real company, helping them map the milestones and strategy required to be an attractive investment opportunity for venture capital. At the time, things were already in flux and there was no clear path forward. Elana Benedikt created a good summary of our interview and I had intended to post it here…

Last week I participated in an open Q&A session for the MassChallenge Israel 2020 cohort to discuss seed stage investing. While some of the questions were the standard fare – what is the difference between Seed and Series A? What is a pre-Seed? when should we approach angels vs micro-funds vs venture funds? etc. – there were definitely several questions directed at the world post-COVID19 and the impact on venture capital at the Seed stage.

I went back to the summary Elana had created and found that it was mostly still very relevant and reflected the conversation from the MC panel last week. So I am (finally) sharing it here. Thank you to Elana for the summary. Thank you to MC and my fellow panelists for the great session.

At the time this blog post is being written the world economy is struggling with the current repercussions and difficulty of future predictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Large corporations, small businesses, and investors are dealing with new dilemmas. In light of that, we wanted to lay out the key aspects of the Israeli venture capital (VC) environment, with its collaborative nature and emphasize important markers for early success, as a service to early stage ventures. We had the opportunity to learn more about Sapir Venture Partners value set and its approach to finding startups and entrepreneurs that show the most potential to impact the world. We set out to hear about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the investment sector and to gain insight into securing future investment. – Elana Benedikt, April 28, 2020

What Can You Tell Us that Makes the Israeli Early-Stage VC Environment Unique?

In the Israeli ecosystem, early stage VCs are very collaborative. Prior to COVID-19, VCs and entrepreneurs would attend many conferences a year in person, exchanging contact information with each other, and establishing relationships. These events are how most early stage VCs hear about new startups in the market and how entrepreneurs meet investors.

Having a warm introduction from a trusted source or connecting at an industry event, is much more impactful and valuable than sending a cold email. Establishing a relationship with a VC prior to sending a proposal is important for an investor to gain insight into the entrepreneurial team and company.

Successful entrepreneurs develop relationships with many different investors and maintain understanding of the specific type of investment that each VC specializes in. Entrepreneurs need to conduct extensive due diligence to truly understand the business model of each VC and the optimal way of approaching them. Each startup business development team member should be networking, actively seeking these investors, and developing meaningful relationships. Once these relationships are established, entrepreneurs need to be selective in maintaining deeper relations with the key investors in their specific industry and who invest at the relevant stage for their company. Additionally, entrepreneurs should understand the general rule which states that they will be “giving up” approximately 20-35% ownership per round in the early stages.

What is Your Viewpoint of the Early Stage VC Market?

An important fact to keep in mind is the number of opportunities VCs receive per year. For larger VCs it is approximately 1,000/year. Most funds invest in only 5-10 startups a year, and most will assume a 3-year deployment period. Each partner of the firm will personally be active in 5-6 startups at any given time.

Additionally, early stage investing involves significant collaboration between VC firms. This interaction multiplies the size of the network, amplifies ideas, and includes more people adding value. Most early stage rounds will have a single lead investor and other VC firms join as followers but can still contribute to the success of the company through a collaborative approach.

How has the Venture Capital Sector Been Impacted by the COVID 19 Pandemic?

Many investors would say that they are actively looking to invest, even though they may temporarily lack capital, or they prefer to preserve capital for their existing portfolio companies which may require more support. At the early stages we are seeing deals getting a 20% evaluation cut since March 1 2020, and that can be even higher for Series A or Series B companies. Most investors are focused on companies which they had already been engaged with prior to March 1st. Once these deals close, it is difficult to predict how future deals will be initiated and diligence will move forward with limited real-world contact.

What Should Entrepreneurs Do During the COVID 19 Pandemic?

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, investors and entrepreneurs could attend meetings and conferences in person. Today they should be attending as many online networking events as possible, so as to stay relevant and establish relationships with potential investors.

The first step to address during the crisis is to make sure you have enough capital to survive in the short term. Once this is accomplished, secondly focusing on R&D and further developing innovative technologies and solutions. Lastly, you should be prepared to take advantage of the upswing expected when the markets return.

Founders need to be strategic during this time and continue moving their companies forward wherever possible. Despite the challenges. If they can’t be out closing sales then they should focus on R&D and learn from their customers by doing market research to better design their solution. By pivoting away from focusing only on sales, these entrepreneurs can showcase their progress and path to profitability to investors once investing increases again.

A Few Final Quick Tips

If the team has received an offer for investment, there are a few important factors to consider, especially in a time of crisis. There are investors willing to take advantage of entrepreneurs during this difficult time, for example by requesting a larger proportion of equity than they would in a more stable market. Thus, it is imperative to have experienced professionals fully review the term sheet before accepting one from an investor. Another recommendation is to request to be put in contact with other founders in the investor’s portfolio. And reach out to them independently. By doing your due diligence, you’ll be able to identify the best potential fit with an investor and turn down offers that may be challenging partners in your efforts to realize your vision.

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